01474 365671 or 0844 576 9905 info@pmadentalcare.co.uk

THE LEGEND OF THE TOOTH FAIRY has been around for ages. But you may not recognize the winged pixie you know and love from these old traditions…

Originally, Parents Hid Children’s Teeth

Centuries ago in Europe, parents buried their child’s lost tooth in a “tooth garden”. This was believed to prevent an evil witch from stealing the tooth and casting a spell on the child! The same superstition spread around the world. Early American settlers placed children’s teeth in flowerpots. Some people even believed that swallowing the tooth was the best way to protect children from evil.

The Tooth Mouse Helped Children’s Teeth Grow Strong

Another interesting idea was that if an animal swallowed the child’s tooth, that child’s new adult tooth would resemble the teeth of the animal that swallowed it! This superstition evolved into the story of the “tooth mouse”—a French story in which a fairy turns into a mouse and hides under an evil king’s pillow. To save the queen, the mouse proceeds to knock out all of the king’s teeth while he sleeps!

Eventually, Teeth Were Exchanged For Coins

As the tooth mouse tradition grew, children began putting their teeth into their shoes. While they slept, the mouse exchanged the tooth for a coin or two. Many cultures still hold to the tooth mouse tradition, but in others, the tradition morphed from a mouse to the magical tooth fairy!

The “Making” Of A Tooth Fairy?

A Favorite Tooth Fairy Memory?

What was YOUR experience with the tooth fairy when YOU were young? What traditions have you held on to with your own family? We’d love to hear them. Please comment below, or on our Facebook page!

Top image by Flickr user IndyDina With Mr. Wonder used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.


COVID-19 UPDATE - November 2020

Despite the latest lockdown we are still open.

Due to social distancing requirements and enhanced infection control procedures we are having to run the practice at a reduced capacity then we would do normally.

Opening hours are 9.00am to 5.00pm Mon-Thurs and 9.00 to 4.00pm Fridays.

Whilst we are doing check ups and routine dentistry we have long waiting times for appointments.

We also run a telephone emergency service during normal working hours. Out of hours advice is available via NHS Direct on 111.

Click here for information on how to deal with dental emergencies at home.

Due to our reduced capacity we are unable to take on new NHS patients but can provide emergency advice and care if appropriate. 

If you want to join our mailing list for news please subscribe.

 

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Pin It on Pinterest